guthooks guides

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Is it too late to reflect on the year that was 2016? Heck with it, I’ll do it anyway! We’ve been so busy here at the Guthook’s Guides team that we never got a chance to shout out about our most eventful year yet, so here goes.

See ya later, 2016. I got places to go, people to see, things to do!

The first big development for the year was that we have a new name (sort of) for our company: Atlas Guides. If you click on the “Trail Guide Apps” link at the top of this page, it brings you to our new, snazzy website. We’re still the same three people working on all of the apps, and the apps in the stores will still be sold by Guthook Hikes (iPhone) and High Sierra Attitude (Android), but most of our new business is going to use the new name. Confusing? No worries– you can still find our most popular apps by searching for Guthook.

And speaking of apps, my goodness we’ve added a bunch in the past year!

  • Mammoth Tracks, the official Ice Age National Scenic Trail app, was released in early spring in partnership with the Ice Age Trail Alliance.
  • We produced an app for the Wonderland Trail around Mt Rainier with guidebook writer Tami Asars. The Wonderland Trail is also available in our Pacific Crest Trail app.
  • We replaced our South Downs Way app with Trailblazer Walking Guides. Both are made in partnership with Trailblazer Guides of England. The new app will house several long-distance trails in Great Britain– so far, we have West Highlands Way and South Downs Way. Soon we’ll be adding Cape Wrath, the North Downs Way, and The Ridgeway, and eventually even more.
  • For our most international app yet we released the Te Araroa Hiker, for New Zealand’s long-distance hiking trail.
  • Continuing the international trend, we released an app for Canada’s Great Divide Trail.
  • We’re teaming with Australian Cycling Holidays to make the CycleWayz app, with dozens of bicycling routes in Australia and Tasmania, and soon to be many more.
  • And, while the New England Hiker was released in 2015, we expanded our coverage of the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire to include almost the entire hiking trail system, including the Presidential Range (the rest should be finished this summer).

My goodness, that was exhausting.

But wait! There’s a lot more in store for 2017. While we will hopefully slow down in the breakneck pace of new apps and trail guides, we’re hard at work on lots of new features for our apps, including a major upgrade to the iPhone app’s look and feel, with a new main menu, improved settings, and an overall improvement in use. It’s the biggest interface change we’ve made in the iPhone version yet.

That’s what we’ve been up to, and what we are currently up to now. I’ll try to keep you informed with news about the apps and other things a little better this year than last. Most small pieces of news will be shared on our Facebook page, so keep an eye out there. In the meantime, get outside and work those legs!

One of the most common questions we receive about our trail guide apps is whether or not they work when you do not have a cell/mobile phone signal. The answer is a resounding “YES, they do work offline”! All of our apps are designed to work when you are in the middle of the wilderness, nowhere near a cell tower. (Otherwise our apps wouldn’t be very useful, would they?)

So, how does that work?

Searching for signal in a wild place.

Searching for signal in a wild place.

When you first download the app from the App Store or the Google Play Store, the device to which you download the app must have an internet connection. The connection can be a WiFi connection or a cell/mobile connection (though a mobile connection may not be the best idea since unlimited/unthrottled data plans are quickly becoming a thing of the past).  While you have that initial internet connection, the latest waypoint and track files are automatically downloaded to your device, plus you have the option to download photos and offline maps to your phone. You should download a map set so that you have topographic and other information about your surroundings.

When you are offline, the app uses your device’s built-in GPS unit to detect where you are and plots that information on a map. GPS, or “global positioning system”, is truly global, and works anywhere on planet Earth since the information is received from satellites.

FAQs:

  1. Will your app work when there is no cell/mobile service? Yes. So long as your device has a GPS receiver, it will work.
  2. Do I need a service plan on my phone to use your app? No. So long as you can connect to the internet with WiFi and your device has a GPS receiver, our app will work on your device.
  3. Will your app work on my iPod Touch? It can. The iPod Touch does not come with a GPS receiver. The same is true of a lot of tablets. But you can purchase an external GPS unit to plug into your iPod Touch, such as a Bad Elf.
  4. I’m pretty sure that GPS isn’t available in [remote location X]. Will your app work? Yes. GPS is global. So long as you are not deep in a canyon or cave (i.e. your phone cannot receive a GPS signal from space), you will be fine. Even in canyons, deep mountain valleys, and under deep foliage, the signal will usually just take longer to acquire.
  5. Can I send messages to my family using your app when I do not have cell/mobile service? No. The GPS unit in a phone and tablet is a GPS receiver. In order to transmit messages using GPS, you need a GPS transmitter, such as a DeLorme inReach or Spot.
  6. Why can’t I see Google maps when I’m offline? We do not use Google maps for offline use because it is against Google’s terms of service to cache the maps for offline use. Rather, we use topographic maps (the style depends upon trail location) that you can download to your device and which are displayed in the background of the map.

Let us know if we forgot anything and we will add to the FAQs.