Trinity Alps

All posts tagged Trinity Alps

**This is the first in an interview series we are doing this year with hiking trail organizations.**

I had a lively conversation this week with Michael Kauffmann, founder and head of the Bigfoot Trail Alliance. Michael is largely responsible for the creation of the Bigfoot Trail (so-called for its location in “Bigfoot Country”, home of the mythic Sasquatch), and passionate about educating the public about the rich biotic and cultural history throughout the Klamath Mountains.

About the Bigfoot Trail:

Big Foot Trail Poster

Location: Northern California’s Klamath Mountains, with a quick dip into Southern Oregon, through 6 Wilderness Areas:

  • Yolla Bolly-Middle Eel Wilderness
  • Trinity Alps Wilderness
  • Russian Wilderness
  • Marble Mountain Wilderness
  • Red Buttes Wilderness
  • Siskiyou Wilderness

Length: 360 miles

High Point: about 7800’

Low Point: Sea level, Pacific Ocean, at Crescent City

Highlights: passes through one of the most biodiverse temperate forests on earth, with 32 conifer species, more than 2000 plant species, and spectacular geologic complexity.

Bigfoot Trail Alliance Founder, Michael Kauffmann:

Michael is an outdoorsman, author and educator. In 2002 he took a hiatus from teaching and hiked the Continental Divide Trail southbound. To his knowledge, he was one of only two people to do a SoBo CDT hike that year. After his hike he was totally hooked on long-distance hiking. Upon completion of the CDT, he moved to Humboldt County in Northern California, eventually getting his Master’s degree from Humboldt State. An educator and ecologist, he has expertise in the region’s conifers, having written two books on the subject. In 2007 while discussing a potential Pacific Crest Trail hike with his wife, Allison Poklemba, she suggested he further explore the Klamath Mountains and create a long-trail locally instead. He took her advice and the idea of the Bigfoot Trail was born.

Creation of the Bigfoot Trail

An educator at heart, Michael’s biggest hope is that the Bigfoot Trail will introduce more people to the Klamath Mountains’ exceptional biodiversity and complex natural and cultural history. In 2008 Michael worked with Humboldt State botany professor John Sawyer (who has since passed away), to map out a trail that would capture the rich biological and geological diversity of the region. Professor Sawyer was the perfect partner for Michael, as he spent his academic career cataloging the flora of the Klamath Mountains. They put together a potential route that winds through the region, passing 32 confier species, and ultimately reaching the Pacific Ocean at Crescent City. In 2009 Michael hiked the route, and that initial route is in place today, though there is still work to do.

Creation of the Bigfoot Trail Alliance

Many of the existing trails that compose the Bigfoot Trail today were built in the 1930s and 1940s, and others have been utilized by Native Americans for millennia. In other words, these are old trails, and they need work. Recently Michael created a Kickstarter campaign, which raised over $14,000. These funds created the Bigfoot Trail Alliance, now a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. With national interest in this new organization, the Alliance held its first board meeting this month (January 2016).

The Alliance is now working with the California Wilderness Coalition on its Northwest California’s Mountains & Rivers program and is partnering with the Siskiyou Mountain Club and the Forest Service to rebuild eight miles of the trail. It hopes to achieve National Recreational Trail status soon.

One of the Alliance’s long term goals is to create a citizen science project to study the effects of climate change on the Klamath Mountains’ biota.

Hikers are taking notice of the Bigfoot Trail. There is now a trickle of Bigfoot Trail thru-hikers each year, and traffic on the trail is increasing. Locals are enthusiastic about the project, with one group already volunteering to adopt a portion of the trail.

Big things are happened on the Bigfoot Trail. Join the Facebook group, and consider becoming a member of the Bigfoot Trail Alliance. Better yet, get out on the Bigfoot Trail and see what the Klamath Mountains have to offer.